Thinking of a property investment in Sydney? Find out the latest property hot spots, and strategies to ensure you get the best outcome.

castlecrag

Bidding at auction is nerve wracking for most people.

Over the last 20 years we have helped hundreds of our clients successfully purchase their dream home or investment property at auction and have put together a list of useful tips and strategies for bidding at auction. Read more

Crows Nest Woolworths

Where are the best suburbs to invest in lower north shore real estate?   Homesearch Solutions currently recommends the suburbs of Chatswood, Crows Nest & North Sydney as hot spots for your investment property purchase.  First of all this is because these are all areas that currently have appeal, great amenities and good proximity to […]

 

With the end of financial year fast approaching, we thought we would provide some general tax strategies for property investors to consider:

1. Documentation: Keep summaries of all your rental income and expenses.

This is much easier if you have your management agent looking after your property where they pay all expenses and collect all income. They will normally provide a monthly and annual statement.

Ensure you have all bank statements showing interest expense. The annual statement should show a summary of interest expense.

A specialist property accountant can assist by ensuring all allowable tax deductions are made.

2. Depreciation: Only registered quantity surveyors are generally authorised to prepare depreciation schedules.

If you are contemplating a renovation a quantity surveyor can produce a scrapping schedule, which puts a value against all items to be thrown away. This value is expensed in the year of expenditure. The new items are then depreciated with a new depreciation schedule.

3. Travel: All your costs to inspect your investment property are tax deductible, including travel. Ensure you apportion any personal component.

4. Interest expenses: Only interest expenses on borrowed funds used to invest are deductible. It is the purpose of the loan that determines deductibility, not the security used to obtain the loan.

A split loan should be considered when a loan is used for both investment and private purposes.

If capitalising interest the Tax Office may require evidence of correct documentation and intention.

Interest deductibility should be easy but if not properly documented and managed this expense can cause frustration if the ATO decides to review and so the assistance of a specialty property accountant should be used.

5. Trusts: The use of a trust can be a major benefit to property investors by improving asset protection, estate planning and increasing flexibility. If using a trust ensure it has been correctly set up and operated to ensure you do not lose your interest deductibility, which is fully allowable by the ATO if you meet the requirements.

6. Pre-pay expenses: If you have a geared investment it is worth considering pre-paying next year’s interest to gain an immediate tax deduction, especially if you’re paying the flood levy this year. You can also get a deduction now by pre-paying next year’s income protection insurance premiums. Also, consider bringing forward expenditure that would otherwise be spent after June 30. If you are planning on doing repairs on your property, note: Care should be taken in determining whether a maintenance or repair is deductible or if it is considered a renovation or of a capital nature. Consider pre-paying other expenses such as rates, levies or possibly even interest (in the right circumstances).

7. Manage capital gains: Capital gains generated during the year can be minimised by offsetting it against capital losses or trading losses incurred during the same year. To reduce capital gain generated on sale of property or other assets during the year consider selling any assets which have lost value and their future is bleak. The 50% discount on capital gains is available where an asset is held for longer than 12 months. As this is a considerable saving consider the timing of any sale. The relevant date for calculating capital gains is the contract date, not the settlement date.

8. Manage capital losses: Capital losses incurred in any year are available to be carried forward to future years if there are insufficient gains to absorb it in the same year. It can be carried forward for an indefinite period. Capital losses cannot be offset against other income such as business trading income if you’ve made a capital gain this year, review your portfolio to see whether it is worth realising a capital loss to offset the gain. You can’t carry losses back. So if you’ve made a capital gain, you may want to trigger a loss to offset it against.

9. PAYG variation: Where you have negatively geared rental investments, the negative part offsets against your other income, e.g. salary, reducing your tax payable and resulting in a large refund when your tax return is lodged. This refund can be used to reduce your loan, pay your interest expense or help finance another investment property. To help with cashflow, would it not be great if you were able to access this refund throughout the year instead of waiting till the end of the year? This can help finance that extra property, which has potential to pick up some capital growth between the beginning and end of year. This can be done by lodging an application to vary the income tax withholding using a form from ATO. This can be done electronically on line or you can download the form, prepare and lodge it manually. PAYG instalment obligations should be reviewed and consideration given to varying the instalment for the June 2012 quarter, where the estimate of income tax payable for the year is less than the instalments raised by the ATO. This will reduce the impact of this instalment on your cashflow.

Written By Ken Raiss of Chan & Naylor Accountants, for Property Observer, on Friday, 15 June 2012

Why rents will keep rising

Source : Tim Lawless. RP Data, as posted on Property Observer 6 March 2012

Rental rates across the combined capital cities grew by 6.3% in 2011, compared with a fall in home values of 3.6%. The superior growth performance of rents compared with values has been a consistent trend over the past five years.

Since the beginning of 2006, rental growth across the combined capital cities has outpaced the growth in home values. Over the period December 2005 to December 2011, capital city home values have increased by a total of 34.5% compared to rental rates having increased by a total of 46.8%. On an inflation adjusted basis, capital city home values have increased by 15.4% over the period and rental rates have increased by 27.7%.

 

why rents will keep rising

Looking at the performance across individual years highlights the fact that you typically see either rents or values growing or in some instances both. Across each year highlighted, one of either values or rents has grown by more than 5%. The results also highlight that if value or rental growth slows, typically the other will increase; the markets tend to be counter-cyclical.

The results are also indicative of a disconnect between housing demand and housing supply given that in any given year values or rents are growing at a rate that is in excess of the growth in inflation.


Across individual capital cities over the five years to December 2011, house values have grown by as little as an average annual rate of 0.1% in Perth and by as much as 7.9% per year in Darwin. Across the combined capital cities, house values have increased at an average annual rate of 4.4% over the last five years.

In comparison, house rents have recorded average annual growth of as little as 2.8% per year in Adelaide and as much as 9.9% annually in Darwin. Across the combined capital cities, rental rates for houses have increased at an average annual rate of 5.8% pear year over the last five years, a full 1.4 percentage points higher than average annual value growth.

Focusing on units, they have enjoyed stronger value growth over the past five years than houses. Across the combined capital cities unit values have increased at an average annual rate of 5.5% per year over the period and have increased by as much as 12.5% per year in Darwin and by as little as 0.9% per year in Perth.

Rental growth for units has outpaced the growth in the value of units over the last five years. Unit rents have increased at an average annual rate of 6.2% annually over the past five years and have increased by as much as 11.9% per year in Darwin and by as little 3.1% per year in Canberra.

The average annual rate of rental growth for houses has outpaced that of units over the past five years in each city except Melbourne, Adelaide and Canberra. Duringthe same timeframe, rental growth for units has outpaced value growth in Sydney, Brisbane and Perth.


Over 2012, RP Data expects that growth in rental rates will continue to outpace the growth in home values. The reason being that we are not anticipating any ‘real’ growth in home values. Additionally, tight rental market conditions accompanied by an insufficient supply of new housing is likely to result in superior levels of rental growth to that of home values.

As always, there is likely to be some disparity between rental growth across individual capital cities. Markets such as Sydney, Brisbane and Perth are anticipated to be the strongest performers for rental growth due to the large discrepancy between housing supply and demand and low rental vacancy rates. On the other hand, rental pressures are not expected to be anywhere near as strong in Melbourne and Adelaide due to higher rental vacancy rates and less of a disparity between housing demand and housing supply.

granny flatsIf you are looking to become a property investor things are looking good for you right now. And, if you happen to be the grandmother of an investor in NSW, you could count your lucky stars.

Interest rates are steady after dropping over the past few months, rental returns are climbing and it’s a great buyers market.  But wait, there’s more… there is a way you can increase your return dramatically.

With the Affordable Rental Housing – State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) or granny flat initiative introduced by the NSW government in 2009, you can add a granny flat to your investment property and rent it separately, resulting in an increased yield and good depreciation benefits. You can also add a granny flat to your own home if you have a large enough block size.

This strategy allows investors to dip their toe in property developing starting with a smaller project like the granny flat to build their property portfolio.

The Sydney market can be expensive, which is what sent one me further afield to find a more affordable investment area.

After purchasing a few investment properties in Sydney, I found that they were all negatively geared. I needed to find properties that would assist with cashflow not drain me.  My research took me to the Hunter region of NSW, and it’s there that I found the perfect fundamentals for an investment market. The local economies are booming thanks to the coal mining industries but also very diverse with wine growing, tourism, manufacturing, agriculture, horse breeding and retail all supporting strong employment.  Coupled with massive government spending on infrastructure projects and strong demand for rental properties, I thought I’d struck gold.

Property Bloom now offers a granny flat service along with our other development strategies. We find properties suitable for a granny flat development, usually three-bedroom houses on large blocks, but not just any houses. They need to meet a long list of our criteria.  We manage all the fine details, including renovating the house and building the flat, creating a positively geared investment.

Investors will benefit from casflow from the rent on two dwellings and also receive good depreciation benefits on the new flat.  This means people can keep moving forward with their investment strategy.  Unlike buying a single apartment in a capital city for instance, which is likely to be negatively geared, adding a granny flat to a property that already has an existing dwelling can result in a cash-flow positive situation.

In the past granny flats were only permitted in certain residential zones, but this SEPP has opened up a whole new real estate door. The aim of the granny flat is to boost the supply of affordable rentals by providing housing for the elderly so families can support each other, as well as the younger generation who are living at home and are not in a position to move out just yet.

Government projections show us that single-person households are likely to be the fastest-growing sector over the next 20 years, so demand is definitely there.

Small secondary dwellings are an attractive option for singles and couples who don’t need a lot of room and are the most likely people to be under rental stress. Young people are also staying at home longer, and granny flats can provide extra space for them and be a lifesaver for baby boomers who were hoping to empty their nests sometime soon.

In the Hunter, we are finding properties for around $240,000 and with the addition of a two-bedroom granny flat, which we can build for around $95,000; it’s a really affordable investment for a total cost of around $350,000. These projects are creating a 9% to 10% gross rental yield, and like the northern beaches, the rental markets are extremely tight in the Hunter. This type of development suits someone starting out in developing or an investor looking to create a positively geared investment.

To take advantage of the NSW government’s Affordable Rental Housing – State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) the regulations include:

  • Granny flat must be no more than 60 square metres in size
  • Land must be more than 450 square metres
  • Can only be one house and one granny flat on the land
  • The land cannot be subdivided
  • You will need to comply with the LEP of your council (contact council re building
    requirements)
  • It must meet the requirements of the Building Code of Australia

For more information on the Affordable Housing SEPP visit the government’s website.

Source : Jo Chivers, Property Observer. 16 February 2012

 

New Unit Depreciation?

Many financial planners and investment property “experts” advise people to buy brand new units so that they can get the tax depreciation benefits, which can be offset from their personal income for their annual tax return.
However from what I have seen from many of these brand new “generic” units over the past 10 years, particularly ones in medium to large complexes, is their relative lack of capital growth compared with say older style art deco units or even 1960/70’s buildings that are in a better location (for Sydney – near beaches, inner city, harbour etc).
A new investment property buyer claims depeciation expenses on an annual basis, but when eventually selling the property they have to add back in the total of those benefits claimed for capital gains tax calculations anyway, thus negating the benefit in the overall property transaction.
The bottom line is that the tax depreciation benefits gained by buying new units will rarely equal the extra capital growth achieved with buying an older style unit in a better location.
Many new unit complexes tend to be built in former industrial areas or on the city fringes because the land is cheaper, and are often not close to amenities.